Veteran Curators’ Secret Weapon to Saving Internet Resources

Student created Time Machine in 2001
Classroom built time machine

Calling the WayBack Machine! Did you know that the World Wide Web will celebrate the 30th anniversary of its first publicly available website on August 6? Since that historic day in 1991, the number of users, devices, websites, and online content has been increasing daily and is not likely to stop growing any time soon. However, not everything stays alive on the Internet.  For every piece of new information added, older content will go missing whether it’s a website going down – such as an individual blog – or a publisher archiving a newspaper article.

As a curator of web content, how often do you find that a valuable resource link just disappears? What can you do to safeguard the integrity of an original source of information?

Enter the Internet Archive, a digital public library that provides free access to books, web pages, audio recordings, videos, images, and software. Through it’s Wayback Machine, you can enter a URL and look for a previous version of a website or webpage, possibly already archived. 

Users of the Wayback Machine can even ask to index a page for the archive! Wayback addins, extensions, and apps for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Android and iOS assist with the process. For our LiveBinders members, the Wayback Machine offers you the ability to archive valuable resources making your binder content more relevant to your viewers.

Here is an example of how I share a newspaper article archived by the Wayback Machine in my 20th Century Decades Resources LiveBinder

Great Chicago Snow of 1967 image from the Wayback Machine index that appears in my LiveBinder.

LiveBinders Podcast: Success in Digital Literacy

Susan Brooks-Young started sharing resources on digital literacy back in 2011 in her online digital binder called: Building Blocks for Digital Citizenship. Initially the subject occupied a single tab titled “Truth Matters” where Susan shared teaching resources to help students learn how to differentiate authentic information from fabrication.

9 years later and it is clear that it isn’t just our students who face this challenge. Everyday on trusted apps and websites, consumers are bombarded with an array of truths, misinformation and now a new term: disinformation. Most of us don’t have the skill set to recognize the differences between them. And as my podcast co-host Linda and I learned, the social implications are just the tip of the iceberg.

It is no surprise that the demand for Susan’s digital literacy resources grew. That single tab became an entire online binder: Truth Matters – Digital Literacy in the Post-Truth Era, and then the supporting material for her new book: The Media-Savvy Middle School Classroom: Strategies for Teaching Against Disinformation, and finally her new website: MediaLiteracyToday. All three resources work together to support educators who need to teach this vital skill.

Please join Linda Houle and I as we learn how LiveBinders was exactly what Susan needed to organize her resources. We also dive into the topic of misinformation vs disinformation, why fake news isn’t even news , and how we can all recognize our own echo chambers.

Click here to listen to the podcast on iTunes.
Click here to view the LiveBinders Podcast Binder with links to the binders and resources mentioned in the interview.

Writing down New Year Resolutions

Setting New Year’s resolutions can be a great way to focus on one’s goals and develop a growth mindset.

In his two-year study, University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson had 700 students write down their goals in a class called Maps of Meaning. Asking them to reflect on fundamental moments in their life that he referred to as “self-authoring,” Peterson instructed his students to list different strategies and goals that would help them overcome their obstacles. After 2 years, he found that the achievement gaps between minority groups and white students closed significantly for those who participated in the assignment compared to those in the control group who did not.  “The act of writing is more powerful than people think,” Peterson shared.

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Photo by Brad Neathery on Unsplash

Inspired by both Melissa Dahl’s story for The Cut and Anya Kamenetz’s NPR story about Dr. Peterson’s research, I wondered if students in class, or even at home, are encouraged to reflect on and write down goals.  As a result of these exercises, would these students be able to learn resilience?

Resilience is something that researchers are now identifying as a ‘growth mindset’, a term coined by Carol Dweck in her book, Mindset. Adopting a growth mindset encourages people to realize that their abilities can be improved over time with intentional and consistent effort. Goal writing seems like a great way for students to start learning and improving their own resilience.

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Photo by Brad Neathery on Unsplash

Around the same time that I discovered Peterson’s research, I was delighted to find a binder designed specifically for students and goal setting.  Titled ‘New Year’s Resolutions,’  the binder is curated by one of our Certified Trainers, Stella Maris Berdaxagar, who designed exercises for ELA students geared not only towards improving their writing skills, but also setting personal goals and writing New Year’s resolutions.

Berdaxagar’s binder has guided steps on how a teacher can provide activities that encourage teen and adult students to reflect not only on what they’ve accomplished in the past year, but also on what their new goals are, and how they plan to attain them. Berdaxagar also includes an impressive selection of engaging activities that help students learn skill sets that could last them a lifetime.

Please let me know what you think!

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New Year’s Resolution Binder by Stella Maris Berdaxagar


Ready to Impress?

Have you curated an impressive body of resources to share?  Feel free to contact me for a brief demo on how curators like Berdaxagar are easily packaging and distributing their resources with our online digital binders. 

You’re welcome to schedule a LiveBinders demo here.

This blog post is based on a personal project I have started about organization skills and learning in the digital age.  I’m always inspired by the cool binders I find on our Featured Binders page.

Twitter for business uses

Twitter has been in the paper recently with talks about trying to find ways in which to monetize their popularity. (Doesn’t it seem like a common theme with many of our venture funded startups this quarter?)

In addition to advertising, one avenue they are looking at is to see how useful the twitter application can be for business.   How does a tool used for announcing your whereabouts and general attention grabbing convert to a serious business application?   Well there are some fans that have come up with initial suggestions that have been compiled here in this LiveBinder.

To view just click on the link below and go through each of the tabs in the binder.

Enjoy!

Product Positioning Resources

I’ve spent over 20 years in marketing. I’ve positioned so many products in the market that I’ve lost count. I’ve gathered the best resources on the web and written some of my own, but I have to admit that my best lessons in positioning are from my 9-year-old son. Here is a recent conversation:

Sandor: ‘Mom, I need a 50 cent chore.’

Me: (I’m thinking great! I have this plant that was in my pond in its plastic pot, but it grew well beyond its pot so that it was twice the size of the pot.) ‘Okay, Sandor, see that plant that I pulled out of the pond? All those roots need to be cut off so that we can get that plastic pot out of there and put the rest in the compost.’ (I’m thinking this will keep him busy for at least an hour.)

Sandor: (Thinks for 20 seconds) ‘Okay!’

Me: (Very suspicious about him signing up for this much work) ‘Are you sure?’

Sandor: ‘Yep!’ (I leave the room)

Sandor: ‘Alex! I get to perform surgery on a plant – would you like to try it first?’

Needless to say Alex did most of the work and Sandor got the 50 cents.

Okay, so in 20 seconds, he analyzed his target market (Alex) and found a message (surgery) that would appeal to her, then he added sense of urgency (try if first), threw in emotion (great enthusiasm in his voice) and was able to monetize (50 cents) the transaction.

If you can’t do this as quickly as Sandor, you may want to use some of the resources that I have discovered on the web. Click on the binder below to view the sites:

A Livebinder filled with Marketing Resources

Looking for some marketing ideas to engage and motivate your customers? This Livebinder was put together for business technology marketers and media planners. It is a collection of marketing information with tools, and resources that will help you design and implement campaigns that will engage your marketing audience.

Just click on the binder icon below to launch the livebinder. Then click on the tabs at the top of the page to view the different web pages.

It is a vast wasteland out there…

My dad used to say that about TV (and with the writer’s strike, it couldn’t be more true!) A talented writer in his own right, he unfortunately didn’t live long enough to see the Internet take off. But, if he had lived to see it, he would have been both delighted by the access to information and appalled by the abysmal writing on so many of the websites out there.

It is a lot of work to present information clearly, concisely, and then to make it compelling on top of that. I just saw this delightful quote from Seth Godin:

“Nobody learns everything all at once. The story has to begin with something compelling enough that you want to learn more about the story. The mistake marketers make is that they tell all the story at once, take it or leave it. People need to realize they have to ensure a unfolding dialogue.” – Seth Godin from this article:http://www.wordtracker.com/academy/figuring-out-the-words-the-seth-godin-interview

Isn’t this the perfect thought when you think about writing for a website? Writing for a website is an art that not enough of us have mastered!

So, the LiveBinder below is my contribution to cleaning up the mess. If you write for a website, please promise me you will read at least one of these articles. I promise you that I will continue to reread them until the words on my websites are polished and sparkle like little gems!

When I sent this LiveBinder to my dear friend Kaye McKinzie (who is a fabulous writer), she wrote back:”Wow..This is amazing!! What I learned in 20 minutes gives me an entire skill set. Remarkable!”